January 7, 2015
by Paul
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Classic Movie CPR: The Sandlot

CPR in Movies: The SandlotOne of the most memorable scenes of CPR in film comes from 1993’s The Sandlot. A magic moment, indeed.

“Michael Squints Palledorous walked a little taller that day and we had to tip our hats to him. He was lucky she hadn’t beat the crap out of him. We wouldn’t have blamed her. What he did was sneaky, rotten, low and cool…”

January 7, 2015
by Isaiah
1 Comment

When CPR Fails

When CPR FailsPicture this: an average person (not a medical professional) is shopping for groceries. Ahead of them, a man in his late forties collapses and falls unconscious. The person sees this and, acting quickly, runs to the man and asks if he is okay. Seeing he is unconscious, the person calls 911 and begins performing CPR on the man.

EMS personnel arrive on the scene and take over. The man is rushed to the hospital and pronounced dead.

What could have been done differently?

Honestly, not a whole lot.

The thing that most people don’t know is that CPR, which stands for Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation, is ironically not intended to resuscitate a person at all. Its goal is to circulate enough oxygen to keep the brain from dying, but this process very rarely results in a person regaining consciousness.

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January 7, 2015
by Isaiah
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CPR: Hollywood’s Miracle Cure (5 characters that never should have made it)

CPR in LOSTUndeniably, CPR is a valuable skill for people of any occupation. More people should know it, and more people should use it more often. It saves lives…

But not on its own.

The truth is that CPR is meant to extend the opportunity for professional medical services to arrive and take over; CPR on its own has an abysmally low rate of efficacy if unaccompanied by calling 911 or at least using an AED (Automatic External Defibrillator).

The thing is, nobody told Hollywood.

As a result, movies and television are rife with portrayals of CPR being some miraculous cure-all for what Miracle Max would describe as being “mostly dead.” Let’s walk through some of them.

1. The Hunger Games: Catching Fire

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January 6, 2015
by Tyler
1 Comment

4 Tools to Make CPR Student-Centric

School CPR“Courage is a special kind of knowledge; the knowledge of how to fear what ought to be feared and how not to fear what ought not to be feared.” 
- David Ben-Gurion 

Ben-Gurion’s statement powerfully articulates the importance of understanding the 5 fears that stop people from providing bystander CPR in an emergency situation. Fighting these fears is essential for building the confidence a person needs to move from being a bystander who does nothing to a bystander who acts. Like the fears that Ben-Gurion faces, the fears that a bystander faces in an emergency are best fought with knowledge. The vital role that knowledge plays in creating confident rescuers in turn emphasizes the importance of creating student-centered CPR training.

While this may seem obvious, CPR training has historically emphasized control and consistency over student-centric learning. Tweaks to the intricate parts of CPR and large simplifications to the procedure have been focused on while the methods and tactics of how that knowledge is conveyed have been comparatively neglected.

The ProTrainings Student CPR program sees schools as a unique opportunity to not only reach a large pool of great potential rescuers but also as a favorable arena where there can be a balance of student-centric learning and consistent standards of education. The challenge in this is to create tools that can adapt to individual schools’ varying policies, classroom norms, technological capabilities, resources and time. While this will be a continuous journey, the program has already made great strides in this direction.

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December 18, 2014
by Genevieve
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Building Confidence and Eliminating Fears

CPR FearsSo often in life we only award efforts that bring about success. Fear of failure permeates the culture we live in, and most people only stick out their necks if they are guaranteed the outcome is bright and full of gold stars, easy accomplishments, and success. This has created a world full of people scared to try anything that might fail.

As potential rescuers, it is important to fight off the mindset of success and failure. The goal of any CPR education should be to cultivate the bravery to try. The second your knees hit the pavement next to a victim, your compressions buy them time and the chance to live. Bravery is having a quality of mind that says, “I will help this person regardless of my fear, and regardless of the outcome.”

The following letter was written by one of Student CPR’s leading educators, paramedic Roy Shaw. He wrote to Lynn, a lay rescuer who attempted to revive her neighbor by administering CPR. The neighbor did not survive and Lynn wanted to know if she failed.

Hello Lynn,

It sounds like you’ve had a rough couple of days.  First, because a neighbor and potentially their friends and family members are experiencing a living nightmare right now, and secondly, because you may be feeling like you did not do enough, or do it well enough.

These feelings are very normal, and not because you did anything wrong.  It’s just normal to feel sad that the situation did not turn out the way we would have wanted it to.  The fact that you did any CPR at all means that you gave this gentleman a chance at survival.  Please remember, CPR is not designed to save lives directly.  Its purpose is to slow down the process of moving from clinical death to biological death in order to possibly intervene with advanced life support and buy more time to get the person to the hospital. CPR can sometimes help the body respond to the medications and electrical therapy but it does not take away the reason the person went into cardiac arrest in the first place in most cases.  There can be so many reasons why a patient goes into cardiac arrest and why they seemingly don’t respond.  It’s important to remember that your neighbor was already clinically dead when you arrived by their side.  You gave them and their family members a wonderful gift.  You moved out of your comfort zone and gave this person a second chance at survival.  Something they wouldn’t have had if you wouldn’t have tried.  The fact that your neighbor did not survive cardiac arrest does not take anything away from your efforts and your compassion.

You acted bravely and selflessly.  That is not the norm in our culture.  You are the exception and I say well done!  Please, be at peace knowing that the most experienced and effective rescuers don’t always achieve the outcome that others wish would happen.  True rescuers try their best to make a possibility for a tomorrow, regardless of the outcome and make the world a more loving place and show the world compassion by doing so.

Be at peace knowing that you did a wonderful act of love and compassion.

Most sincerely,

-Roy

November 18, 2014
by Paul
0 comments

Teen in Missouri saves Baby with CPR in Walmart

Abby SnodgrassAnother teenage hero has saved a life thanks to the CPR she learned in high school. Hillsboro High School student Abby Snodgrass was in a Walmart dressing room when she heard a distressed mother call for help.

Abby ran from the dressing room and found a crowd gathered around a mother with an 11-month-old infant girl. The child’s mother was panicked and no one was doing anything to help save the child’s life.

Because of Abby’s CPR class a few months earlier, she knew what to do. She performed chest compressions, and the child began breathing again.

Jesse Barton, the Valle Ambulance District Chief, told KSDK that CPR training began for Hillsboro school district’s high school students in the fall of 2013 – and that ‘By the end of this year we will have taught it to around 600 kids.’

If you would like to bring CPR training to your high school, register today!

Missouri hasn’t yet made CPR mandatory for high school graduation, but given the current trend, it’s only a matter of time.

via People

July 23, 2014
by Elizabeth Shaw
3 Comments

Brothers invent outstanding CPR device

(Photo: Tania Savayan/The Journal News)

(Photo: Tania Savayan/The Journal News)

You can tell that John and Christopher Di Capua are bright young men with  the ambition to help people and make CPR more efficient and effective. What started as a high school research project has now turned into a product with a purpose to save lives. CPR is a lifesaving skill, but oftentimes, people get tired, or there is only one rescuer. The product they invented made both of these problems all but obsolete.

“Less than 10 percent of people who get CPR from a bystander live to tell about it. Nearly 400,000 people every year — more than 1,000 every day — receive CPR from a bystander,” notes an article from USA Today. The statistics are daunting, but they should never keep us from performing CPR on someone; you never know if the person you help will be the one to live.

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July 23, 2014
by Elizabeth Shaw
1 Comment

Teen girls rescue drowning paddle boarder

Teenage Girl HeroesThree teenage girls noticed a paddle board floating on lake, and floating next to it, a man face down in the water. Jessie Page, Zoe Farrell, and Alexis Koester  jumped into the water and swam over to the man, unaware of whether he was alive. They thought he might have been floating for fun, but when they saw him face-down, they knew something more serious was going on.

“I tapped him and we got no response, so we flipped him over and got him up on his board,” said Koester. The man coughed a little, but showed no other signs of reviving. The girls pushed the board to the dock, where their friends helped lift the man onto the dock.

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